Is Debt Negotiation Bad


Is Debt Negotiation Bad?

Is Debt Negotiation Bad?
By Paul Jesse

Educating yourself about the ins and outs of debt negotiation is a good first step. Please note that the term ‘debt negotiation’ is also known as debt arbitration or debt settlement.

For starters, a lender has little motivation to arbitrate anything less than the full amount unless the person is two to three months behind in payment.

To answer your question is debt negotiation bad? You need view it as a last-resort measure. The truth of the matter is it’s one step away from declaring bankruptcy.

Remember, your lender gave you the money or property in good faith. He or she has every right to expect that the loan be repaid in full. Morally, you should do everything that is within your power to pay your debt(s).

However, this is not always possible and despite how much you would like to repay the loan in full you just can’t – not now and not in the foreseeable future. This is where debt negotiation comes into play. It may be your only logical course of action.

And, in the case of an old debt that you’ve long since forgotten about, debt negotiation would be the best way of dealing with it. There’s no point in keeping a small blemish on report when a little negotiation can easily turn things around.

But if you find yourself overwhelmed with your current debt load, credit counselling should instead be your first action step. A credit counsellor will give you some tools and suggestions for reducing your payments.

Debt consolidation may be more appropriate. A credit counsellor will walk you through the debt consolidation process. In a nutshell, it means creating a whole new loan for a longer period of time. This would hopefully lower your payments enough so you can get back on track.

Please know however, that debt consolidation can be nothing more than a way of putting off the evitable. It really does little to correct the problem. That’s why many people come back to debt negotiation as a way of getting out of their financial problems and starting fresh start.

If you’re determined to pay of your debt(s) and turn over a new ‘financial’ leaf you may wish to contact your creditors yourself. By doing so, you may be able to negotiate a lower interest rate or a more realistic repayment plan. This is known as self arbitration.

So, is debt negotiation bad if you really need it? The bottom line answer is no. When your debt is very delinquent, negotiation is often in your best interest. If this is the case, now is the time to either consider self arbitration or seek out the help of a debt negotiation company.

Although a debt negotiation program will lower your credit score for as long a you’re in the program, you’ll also find that most debt negotiation companies require the creditor to make sure that the final credit report reflects the account is now paid in full. Therefore, once your account is settled you will no longer have a negative report.

A number of debt negotiation companies also include a credit repair service as part of their debt negotiation program. This repair service removes any negative items caused by the program. Although it is part of the program there are additional fees associated with this service.

Is debt negotiation bad? Ultimately, you’re the best person to judge whether debt negotiation is right for you or if it’s in your best interest to consider another alternative such as debt consolidation.

This is where negotiation and your question, “Is debt negotiation bad?” comes in. Debt negotiation is bad in that it means the complete destruction of your credit history.

Paul Jesse is a retired government employee and author of numerous home business and financial articles.
http://www.sheamarketing.com/student-loan-debt-consolidaion

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/

+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++


Identity Theft Monitor Your Credit Report


Identity Theft – Monitor Your Credit Report

Identity Theft – Monitor Your Credit Report
By Charles Essmeier

The recent security breach at credit card processor CardSystems Solutions has many consumers worried. Thanks to a well-placed computer virus, nearly forty million credit card numbers were stolen, and cardholders nationwide are justifiably concerned about identity theft. Should a thief steal your identity, he or she could run up thousands of dollars worth of debt in your name and it could take years to sort out the ensuing financial mess.

Fortunately, a relatively new tool is available to consumers to help alert them to potential fraudulent activity on their credit record. Each of the three main credit bureaus offer a subscription-based credit monitoring program, as do numerous banks and financial institutions. Fees vary, but $50 or so per year is typical. The bureaus will notify consumers of activity conducted under their names, including the opening of new accounts, changes of address, credit inquiries from lenders, late payments and lawsuits and liens. Notification can come in the form of e-mail or even a message to your cell phone, if you like.

Should you be notified of suspicious activity, you can then call the appropriate agency, be it a lender, the credit bureau itself or the police, if necessary. The packages vary in both prices and features, so interested consumers should shop around to find a plan that works to fit their needs.

A free alternative is to obtain a free credit report. Thanks to a law passed last year, Americans can obtain one free report from each of the three credit bureaus per year through a special Website. By obtaining one report every four months, consumers can keep an eye on activity under their name for free. This is not nearly as effective as subscribing to a monitoring plan, which will notify you when activity takes place, but it is better than doing nothing at all. With the recent security breaches by major credit card processors, consumers who are worried about being victims of identity theft have genuine concerns. The credit bureaus are doing what they can to help, and the monitoring programs and free credit reports are a step in the right direction.

©Copyright 2005 by Retro Marketing.

Charles Essmeier is the owner of Retro Marketing, a firm devoted to informational Websites, including End-Your-Debt.com, a site devoted to debt consolidation and credit counseling, and HomeEquityHelp.com, a site devoted to information regarding mortgages and home equity lending.



+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

Dangerous Debt Consolidation Loans


Dangerous Debt Consolidation Loans

Dangerous Debt Consolidation Loans
By Kevin Adelsberg

On the surface, debt consolidation loans offer cash-strapped consumers some relief from high interest rates. Looking deeper, consumers should be wary of both the pros and cons of this fast growing practice. In their simplest forms, debt consolidation loans are refinance agreements, second mortgages, or home equity loans.

All three loan options allow homeowners to cash out part of the equity in their homes in order to pay off other debts. For borrowers who have watched their homes appreciate in value, a debt consolidation loan can eliminate the burden of multiple monthly payments without significantly affecting the amount of their monthly mortgage payment. On a mathematical level, debt consolidation loans can make much sense. A home owner who struggles to make the monthly minimum payments on her 21% interest rate credit cards can roll those balances into her 7% mortgage. The debt doesn’t go away, but the rate goes down by two thirds. In many cases, she would only continue to pay about the same amount per month for her mortgage, freeing up her cash flow for other uses. As a side benefit, borrowers can deduct a portion of their mortgage interest payments from their income taxes each year. Though not a huge savings, many taxpayers love the opportunity to look forward to a larger tax return.

The danger lies in the borrower’s loss of security on two levels. First, if a home should suddenly depreciate, a debt consolidation loan customer could quickly find himself or herself “upside down” on the loan, owing more than what the house is worth. As long as that borrower continues to make payments, they’ll survive. But, they will be unable to sell their home without absorbing a loss.

For families who need to move in order to accept job transfers or pursue educational opportunities, this can be a devastating blow. Second, although the lending bank handles paying off the customer’s outstanding debt, the customer must personally close their old credit accounts. For many customers, the temptation to keep those accounts open is far too great, and they find themselves deeper and deeper in debt. In effect, the debt consolidation improved their cash flow, but reversed their financial course.

Without immediate intervention, these customers often find themselves on the road to bankruptcy. When investigating debt consolidation loans, consider your long-range plans. If you intend to stay in your current home for a long time and can handle the potential risk of depreciation, and if you can exert the willpower to close out your paid off charge accounts, then a debt consolidation loan may be a reasonable option for you.

Kevin Adelsberg is a writer for FDLoans.com. For additional articles and an extensive resource for everything about loans, please visit us at http://www.FDLoans.com


+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

10 Signs You May Need Credit Counseling


10 Signs You May Need Credit Counseling

10 Signs You May Need Credit Counseling
By Jeremy Zongker

Debt management programs can be of real help for people that discover they cannot face their debts. At first, they will attempt to solve the situation all by themselves by cutting down on spending and keeping a close eye on accounts. If this doesn’t work then it is time to ask for help from a financial expert. The sooner you admit you need help from an expert, the better will be for your future. The best time to seek the advice of an expert is before the appearance of most of the important 10 signs you may need credit counseling. You should already be worried when one or two signs appear. Of course that there are not only 10 signs you may need credit counseling but, these 10, are the most important. When you see more than a few of 10 signs at the same time, know that the situation is bad and getting into a debt management program could be the right solution for you.

There are not a fixed number of signs that can tell you your debts are slowly killing your financial life, but in the following lines we will try to present the most important 10 signs you may need credit counseling. The most important sign is loosing your job or the possibility to loose it. The first thing you think of when you loose a job is how you will pay all your bills. In such a situation it is best not to loose your cool. You may think you just need to start looking for a new job and the bad situation will be solved. In case your next job does not come in the near future, the best thing for your financial situation would be to ask the advice of a credit counselor; even for the most desperate situations he will certainly have a solution. You should also be worried when your credit card balances are increasing while your monthly income is decreasing. This would mean that, in short time, you’ll not be able to pay your monthly minimum payments. This is another sign that you need credit counseling; if paying the minimum amounts required on your accounts is a situation that lasts a short period of time, and then the problem is not that bad. But if the situation repeats itself over and over again, this is a sure sign you may need credit counseling.

When you discover that you have more credit cards then you need, know that this is one of the 10 signs you may need credit counseling. You have more cards then you need because you’re trying to pay an existing card with the cash advances obtained from other new cards. Another situation that could indicate you need the advice of an expert is when you’re constantly charging monthly more than you pay. If this is the first sign of financial trouble many people will try to work it out on their own by working overtime or taking a part time job. As we said before, if the situation is for a short period of time and you manage to get out of trouble all is fine but if it continues for a longer period this is another sign that you may need credit counseling. Also, if you start getting letters or phone calls about late bill payments, you should be worried at once.

These 10 signs you may need credit counseling do not appear all at once; in time, one after the other, they will eventually appear. But it is mostly important to recognize them all, admit you have a problem and ask for help. There are situation in which the signs mentioned before appear at a certain moment but the person in trouble cannot see them or refuses to see them. More than that, people in financial trouble don’t know how much they owe and don’t want to find out. This is another sign that financial counseling is needed. The situation could get worse in case all this financial problems are not made known to the spouse as well. And, sometimes, when trying to hide such a bad situation, people in trouble are using their savings to pay off the monthly bills.

The best advice for people that are experiencing this kind of trouble is to not let all the signs accumulate. When few of them appear and repeat themselves for a longer period of time, wise people should ask for advice from a financial expert that will surely have few options to get them out of debts.

This article has been provided courtesy of Creditor Web. Creditor Web offers great credit card articles available for reprint and other tools to help you search and compare credit card offers.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/


How to Reduce Your Debt in 5 Easy Steps


How to Reduce Your Debt in 5 Easy Steps

How to Reduce Your Debt in 5 Easy Steps
By Chileshe Mwape

If you have incurred substantial personal debt, consider these options: budgeting, debt consolidation, credit counselling from a reputable organization and working with your creditors. You will need to choose a debt reduction method that will work best for you? The method you use will depend on your level of debt, how much spare money you have, your level of discipline, and how quickly you want to get out of debt.

1. REALISTIC BUDGETING

The first step towards taking control of your financial situation is to do a realistic assessment of your income and expenditure. Work out how much you earn (your total income) and write this figure down. Then total your expenses. This is how much you spend each month for rent, fuel, food, clothing, heating, water, electricity and other bills. The difference between your total income and your total expenses is the amount of money available to pay your creditors or lenders.

Decide if there are any monthly expenses that you can reduce or live without. Focus on lowering your expenses so that you can increase your income. You’ll be amazed at how many things you can do without.

a) Debt Reduction Methods

Choose a debt reduction method that fits your situation and gives the maximum benefit. You could choose to focus on repaying debts that are most important to your credit rating or to maintaining your family’s safety. Or you can start by paying off those debts with the highest interest rate thus reducing the total spent on interest charges and increasing the amount available to pay off debt.

Alternatively, you could focus on paying off bills with the lowest balances. Then the money used for those payments can go to pay off other debts.

If your credit payments (excluding mortgages) exceed 15-20% of your take home pay, you can work with creditors to set up monthly instalments that are more in line with your income.

b) Credit Cards

Transfer your credit card debts (balance) to a card offering an introductory 0% interest rate for balance transfers. Make sure you keep up the repayments and then just before your 0% introductory offer is up, apply for another 0% card, transfer the balance over before you starting paying interest – and repeat. With a good credit record, you could do this for years, moving your debt from one card to another until it’s paid off.

3. DEBT CONSOLIDATION

This is when you use a new loan to pay off multiple debts. Your monthly payment will be lower because repayment is spread out over a longer period of time. This will usually eliminate the hassle of having multiple creditors, multiple bills, and multiple payments to make. It’s very important not to take out any additional loans until your consolidation loan has been repaid. Borrowing against your home is a cheap way to raise money, but it’s risky. If you can’t make the payments – or if your payments are late – you could lose your home.

However, you could replace expensive debts with a cheaper personal loan (unsecured loan). Before taking on new debts, you might want to check out your credit history.

4. CREDIT COUNSELING

Some people are not disciplined enough to create a workable budget and stick to it. If you can’t work out a repayment plan with your creditors and you can’t keep track of mounting bills, consider contacting a credit counselling organization or a financial advisor. In the UK you can use free debt counselling services such as the Consumer Credit Counselling, the National Debtline and the Citizens Advice Bureau. Similar services are available in the US.

5. CONTACTING YOUR CREDITORS

A creditor is a company or person to whom you owe money. Many people struggling financially ignore debts and fear contacting their creditors. This reaction will damage your credit record. Creditors or lenders may take action against you in an effort to get payment. If you’re finding it hard to get your bills paid, be the one to contact creditors. They will be more willing to work with you. Work out arrangements that satisfy you both. Explain to each lender that you aim to repay each debt in full over time, but that they must accept reduced repayments for now. Decide how much you can pay them each month and set up a debt repayment plan.

Conclusion
If you’re serious about reducing your debt you should stop spending on your credit cards and stop taking out new loans. To increase your income, consider finding a second job or a lodger. Claim every state benefit that you qualify for and work on cutting down your expenses. Sell stuff that you don’t need on eBay or at Car Boot fairs. Put enough money aside for emergencies, but use the bulk of your savings to pay off debt. Debts usually cost you far more in interest than you gain on your savings. Also, if you have a fairly good credit record, you should transfer your debts to cheaper lenders. Finally, shop around for better deals for services and products that you use.

Disclaimer: This article does not constitute financial advice. If you require such advice, you should seek appropriate professional guidance.

Copyright © 2005. Chileshe Mwape writes for Debt Consolidation Loans UK: http://www.best-debt-consolidation-loan.co.uk/. Visit our site to consolidate debts and apply for a loan online.

This article may be reprinted as long as all the above links are active and clickable.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/

+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++


Credit Repair: How To Deal With Your Creditors


Credit Repair: How To Deal With Your Creditors

Credit Repair: How To Deal With Your Creditors
By Douglas Hanna

If you are in danger of credit problems because you have more debts than you can handle, there are things you can do at least keep your creditors reasonably happy.

First, prioritize your debts or rank them in terms of the ones that can give you the most trouble the quickest. If you’re three months behind on your utility bill and the company is threatening to cut off your power, you should deal with this debt first.

Second, be sure to keep an accurate log of all phone conversations with creditors and copies of all correspondence.

This way, you will have a good record of what’s going on, to whom you spoke last, the date of that conversation and its result. It’s not uncommon for large corporations to have different people or even different departments contacting you about late or missed payments. If you keep accurate records, you will always be able to defend yourself against the claim that you have been unresponsive or uncooperative.

It’s kind of human nature to want to run away and hide from creditors. But it’s better to be aggressive. If you know you are not going to be able to meet a mortgage or credit card payment, call the company before the payment is due. Tell the company’s representative why you are having money troubles. Be sure to give a real reason for your problems such as a divorce or loss of a job, and not just some feeble excuse.

If you can give your creditors a real reason for being in financial trouble, you may find that they are sympathetic and willing to work with you.

Your next step is to arrange a payment plan. When you contact your creditors’ representatives, explain that you know you are behind in your payments but that you want t make a payment arrangement. Let them know what you can afford to pay this month and the next. Make certain they know you intend to make full payment eventually.

You might also see if one or more of your creditors would be willing to let you skip a month’s payment.
Be sure to get all payment plans in writing. If the company’s representative does not volunteer to mail you the plan in writing, send a letter requesting that he or she do so.
Calculate just how much you can afford to pay a creditor before contacting the company. Then, do not agree to pay any more than this, no matter what the company demands. It may take a number of phone calls before the company agrees to a reduced payment. If the company keeps saying “no” to your offer, keep calling until you get a different answer. Or ask to speak to the representative’s supervisor as he or she may have more authority to work out a plan with you.

Finally, always try to negotiate. Your landlord may be willing to let you miss a payment now if you make it up at the end of the lease.

If you have a mortgage, ask your lender if they would take a 60 percent payment now with the promise to make this up over the next few months. If you will be paying late, explain the circumstances and ask that at least they waive the late fees.

If you are having trouble paying for your utilities, see if you can switch to a budget plan or set up a partial payment plan. Most utilities will not cut off your service so long as you are making some kind of payment.

You could sell your car and purchase a cheaper one if a car payment is a problem. If you’re going to make a late payment, be sure to let the lender know in advance. Otherwise, you might find your car has been repossessed. You might ask for an extension of the loan. For example, if you have 36 months left to pay, you might ask to extend this to 42 months in return for lower monthly payments. And if you are leasing a car, see if you can terminate the lease early. All the leasing company can say is “no.”

Being in serious debt is never any fun. But if you tell your creditors what you will do and then do what you say, things will get better.

Article by Douglas Hanna. Douglas is a retired advertising and marketing executive and author of the book “198 Tips & Tricks to Save Money and live Better.” He is the webmaster of http://www.all-in-one-info.com, a free resource for information on a variety of subjects. Please visit his site to subscribe to his free newsletter, “Money Saving Tips & Tricks.”

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/

+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++


Your Credit Card May Be Costing More Than You Think

Your Credit Card May Be Costing More Than You Think!
By Michael Ambrosio

Do you know what your credit card is truly costing you? Many
people assume that they do, but aren’t familiar with the
hidden fees that many credit card companies are charging. In
fact, if you don’t keep close tabs on your credit card, you
may end up paying hundreds of extra dollars per year—without
ever really knowing it!

And if you’re trying to budget your money, those hidden fees
can add up!

Let’s take a look at some of the most common credit card
fees, and then talk about how you can avoid them.

Grace Periods

In the past, we could always count on grace periods before we
ever had to start paying interest. For example, if we
charged our card to the limit, and could get it paid off
before the grace period expired, then it would be like a free
loan—we wouldn’t have to pay any interest.

Unfortunately, the credit card companies are making this
harder and harder to do. For starters, many of them have
reduced the traditional 30 day grace period to 20-25 days.

If you hold a credit card, but didn’t realize this, then
you’re likely paying interest without even knowing it!
What’s worse is that more and more credit card companies are
eliminating grace periods altogether. That means if you
charged lunch today at noon, at 12:01 pm, you would be
already paying interest on it.

How about your credit card? You need to take a close look at
the fine print and find out what kind of grace period you
have. If your credit card company has reduced it
significantly, or eliminated it altogether, you should
seriously consider canceling it and getting a more
user-friendly card.

Late Fees

When is the last time you checked to see what amount your
credit card company charges you for a late fee? The truth is
that these fees have doubled in just the past ten years, and
that, combined with the reduced grace period, means that the
credit card companies are raking in a lot of dough on late
fees!

If it’s possible, you should try and send off the check (or
electronic transfer) the day that you receive your credit
card bill. There are three reasons why it’s important never
to be late. The first is obvious; you will want to do
everything in your power to avoid a hefty late fee. Next, if
you are late, it will likely be reported to the credit agency
and you will have a bad mark on your credit report. The
third is the direst, and we’ll discuss it below.

Interest Rate Hikes

Did you know that if you are late–even one time—on your
credit card payment, the company will in all likelihood raise
your interest rates? That’s right; one late payment gives
them the right to do it. What’s more, that isn’t just
limited to your credit card payment. Any late payments from
any lender that show up on your credit report gives them the
justification to raise your rates, so be careful!

Copyright (c)2005 by Michael Ambrosio. You may publish this
article on your site or in your newsletter provided this
resource box remains in tact. Michael Ambrosio is the author
of many credit related articles. Visit his website today:
http://www.yourcreditandyou.com and rebuild your credit.

+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

About Debt Consolidation Services

What Your Mama Never Told You About Debt Consolidation Services
By Mike McDowski

When someone is extremely deep in debt, and he or she has no other options to prevent bankruptcy, debt consolidation can be his or her savior. Debt consolidation can also be a very wise choice for someone who has many debts on high interest credit cards. Debt consolidation, quite simply, is the process of taking loans and debts and bringing them into one low-interest loan that can be paid off over varying periods. This is a very good choice for many people because it saves them from having to file bankruptcy. Debt consolidation merely requires collateral (such as a home or vehicle) for the interest rates to be lowered and the customer to be on his or her way to debt free living.

Most people understand the basics of debt consolidation, however there are several dos and don’ts in the world of consolidating debt. Most importantly, make sure you research the company before you choose to consolidate your debt with it. Some companies will take advantage of unassuming consumers. Here are a few underhanded tricks unfavorable companies will employ when you are trying to consolidate your debt:

1. Some companies will take advantage of high interest loans, and the benefit of consolidating those loans, by charging exceptionally high fees in the debt consolidation loan. These fees can sometimes even be near the state maximum for mortgage fees. Any company with fees that seem unnaturally high should not be your choice for debt consolidation.

2. Watch out for companies that wait until you are “backed into a corner.” Some companies will let a customer get further and further into debt until the customer is forced to refinance. Someone who has put his or her house will be willing to refinance in order to save his or her collateral (again, usually the home). The unscrupulous company will then charge an excessive refinancing fee.

3. Lastly, be wary of companies that employ “predatory lending.” Predatory lending is when a debt consolidation company allows a customer to be in such debt that they are unable to find another debt consolidator to help them with the debt. The person is forced to stay with their current company and sometimes even file bankruptcy anyway. The company that knowingly led the customer into the dregs of debt comes out on top. Most companies don’t use predatory lending, but it is always a good idea to be extra careful when choosing a debt consolidator.

Good debt consolidation companies naturally don’t do anything underhanded. On the contrary, a worthwhile company offers the customer all the information he or she will ever need about their loans and interest. The company is helpful and concerned for the financial safety of their customers. Companies that realize that the decision to consolidate one’s debt is a weighty one are usually the best companies to opt for. Approaching each case uniquely is the sign of a debt consolidator that understands the importance of every customer.

Debt consolidation can be a weighty decision for many people to make. If you keep in mind the dos and don’ts of choosing a debt consolidation company, you will have no worries. Some companies try underhanded methods to increase their profits, but if you know what to watch out for, those companies cannot swindle you. Debt consolidation is a wise choice for anyone who has high interest credit cards, and substantial loans. Follow my advice, and I’m sure that you’ll be debt free sooner than you can say, “Consolidate!”

Mike McDowski writes about a variety of financial matters and advocates debt consolidation with Credit Solutions ( http://www.creditsolutions.com ).

+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

Is Independence Overrated?

Is Independence Overrated?
By David D. Wells

Happy Independence Day from The Money Motivator!

If you don’t celebrate “The 4th of July” like we do in the United States, today still presents you with an awesome opportunity to examine your independence.

Independence means the quality or state of being dependent.
The word dependent means not subject to control by others, according to Merriam-Webster Online Dictionary.

A full 95% of the world will NEVER know what it feels like to have true independence.
True independence involves being free from debt, which is a form of control. I have seen debt destroy far too many relationships, including mine. It was not until I decided to stop the cycle of debt that I was able to begin to enjoy life.

Today can mark your first step in gaining true independence. You must complete one simple action. The first step is simple, yet it can be so powerful that it can set off a firestorm of ideas to end your finance problems.

What is the first step? It is simply to DECIDE to eliminate debt wherever possible. For now do not concern yourself with how this will happen, just make the decision and in due time you will find the solutions.

Today just decide to eliminate debt and then go out and have fun. In later articles I will reveal techniques and strategies to help you blast off on your way to total financial freedom.

I also invite you to send me emails on creative ways that you may have to eliminated debt, so that I may share them with other readers, giving you full credit. My email address is david@themoneymotivator.com.

Visit www.themoneymotivator.com to read my true story on how I began to eliminate debt. It is my hope that my story can inspire you to start to believe that you can change your circumstances in an instant. Also in my story is a technique I used to save money.

To answer the question posed by the title of ths article, is independence overrated? No, it is underrated and that is why so many people are in debt, and therefore dependent on creditors.

Much More Success,

David D. Wells

Often referred to as The Money Motivator, David Wells is passionate about helping you Crack The Wealth Code to become a money magnet. Let him teach you the techniques Hillary Clinton used to turn $1,000 into $100,000 in the course of a year.

For more information visit his website at http://www.themoneymotivator.com and sign up for his free newsletter, Money Moments.

+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

Different Ways Of Dealing With Debt

Different Ways Of Dealing With Debt
By Dennis Cary

Bills, creditors, debt collectors. Are you yearning for the days when all you had to worry about was the money in your piggy bank? If so, you are far from alone. Whether its illness, loss of a job, or simple overspending, it happens to the best of us. But that doesn’t mean your financial situation needs to go from bad to worse.

Steps You Can Take To Regain Control When Finances Get Out Of Hand…

Developing A Budget: Start by doing a realistic assessment of how much money comes in and how much your spend. List income sources, “fixed” expenses (mortgage or rent, car, insurance) and expenses that vary (entertainment, clothing, recreation). Don’t leave anything out, no matter how trivial it seems.

Obviously, the necessities are your first priority. Then you can prioritize the rest. The bottom line Is, that unless there’s money to cover, you’re going to have to cut back on spending.

Contacting Your Creditors: Many creditors will work with you if you let them know you are having trouble making ends meet. Tell them why it’s difficult for you and try to work out a modified payment plan that reduces your payments to a more manageable level. Don’t let them give up on you – get to them before they resort to collection agency action.

Dealing With Debt Collectors: Nobody wants to deal with the bill collector – least of all you! But, should it happen, be sure you know the rules. The Fair Debt Collection Practices Act is the law that dictates how and when a debt collector may contact you …

A debt collector may not call you before 8a.m. or after 9p.m … or at work if the collector knows that your employer doesn’t approve of the calls. Collectors may not harass you, make false statements, or use unfair practices when they try to collect a debt.

Debt collectors must honor a written request from you to stop further contact.

Bankruptcy: Personal bankruptcy is generally considered the debt management tool of last resort because the results are long-lasting and far-reaching. A bankruptcy stays on your credit report for 10 years, making it difficult to acquire credit, buy a home, get life insurance or sometimes even get a job. Learn more about bankruptcy

On the other hand, bankruptcy is a legal procedure that offers a fresh start for people who can’t satisfy their debts. Individuals who follow the bankruptcy rules receive a discharge or court order that says they do not have to repay certain debts. There are two primary types of personal bankruptcy:

Chapter 13 allows you, if you have a regular income and unlimited debt, to keep property, such as a mortgaged house or car, that you otherwise might lose. In chapter 13, the court approves a repayment plan that allows you to pay off a default during a period of three to five years, rather than surrender any property.

Chapter 7 known as straight bankruptcy, involves liquidating all assets that are not exempt. Exempt property may include cars, work-related tools and basic household furnishings. Some property may be sold by a court-appointed official (trustee) or turned over to creditors.

NOTE: You can receive a discharge of your debts under Chapter 7 bankruptcy
only once every six years.

Both types of bankruptcy may get rid of unsecured debts and stop foreclosures, repossessions, garnishments utility shut-offs and debt collection activities. Both also provide exemptions that allow you to keep certain assets, although exemption amounts vary.

Personal bankruptcy usually does not erase child support, alimony, fines, taxes and some student obligations. Also, unless you have an acceptable plan to catch up on your debt under Chapter 13, bankruptcy does not allow you to keep property when your creditor has an unpaid mortgage or lien on it.

Being burdened by debt is overwhelming and puts you into a position of great vulnerability. And, clearly, yielding to bankruptcy is an extreme measure that requires a great deal of thought. In the last few years, a record number of consumers have been filing for bankruptcy.

Copyright © Credit and You | All Rights Reserved |

To find out more about bankruptcy, how the most common chapters of bankruptcy work, bankruptcy terminology, and easy steps anyone can take to repair there credit report, visit http://www.creditandyou.com/dealingwithdebt.html it’s a free information website!

+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++